Tag Archives: Shae Kovalchick

Chinese Cuisine.

Shae Kovalchick

Geo 106

    Food, eating, it’s something we all deal with on a daily basis. Food has a strong link to its surroundings though, certain things can’t be found to eat in certain places. It’s interesting to note then how more local cuisine finds its way across the globe. How exactly does foreign food spread to different countries? More specifically to narrow it down to one type of food, how has Chinese food spread from one location to another?

    The Chinese take great pride in their cooking, and it’s part of the reason their food has spread all over the globe. They have a unique style that dates back to ancient traditions, and they’ve been trying out different recipes and combinations for centuries. Some of their ingredients may seem bizarre, but it’s just due to the fact that they would utilize things that would otherwise just go to waste. That being said what most people perceive as “Chinese” food is only the tip of the iceberg. They have so many different ways to prepare and some many different things they use in their cooking that only a small portion of that makes up what people commonly refer to as Chinese food.

    Another big reason the food has so easily spread is just due to the food itself. The ingredients themselves are generally quite cheap, and when cooked correctly they stay fresh for quite some time. When you factor this in when considering that a lot of people really enjoy the food you can easily see why the food has spread to the locations it has touched down upon. The main way it’s actually sprung up in different locations is just the Chinese people themselves. As they’ve taken to spreading across the globe they’ve more or less just brought their cuisine with them. The first major location outside of China that adopted its cuisine was the Philippines. This was around the 16th century and when a large number of Chinese immigrated there. It’s also evident when you look at locations dubbed “Chinatown” the Asian culture and cuisine in such locations is everywhere.

   Despite these central hubs being where the cuisine is most prevalent, it’s overall appeal and cheap price is what helped it spread even further beyond these locations. It’s not uncommon to see a Chinese restaurant pretty much anywhere in the United States, and that fact rings true for a great majority of the world. It may have originated in China, but the Chinese way of cooking has truly become a global cuisine.

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Work Cited:
Wiradji, Sudibyo M. “Chinese Cuisine Has Spread around the World.” Home. The Jakarta Post, 4 May 2009. Web. 01 Dec. 2013.

Wu, David Y. H., and Sidney C. H. Cheung. The Globalization of Chinese Food. Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi, 2002. Print.

Pictures:

http://www.chinesefoodmishawaka.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Jan-mee.jpg

http://inkchromatography.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/chinese-food.jpg

http://www.chinahighlights.com/image/map/chinacitymap.jpg

Edited by:
Nathan Lee
Kyra Binaxas
Jennah Reiman

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Folk Culture: The Amish.

 

Shae Kovalchick

Geo 106

It would seem Folk Culture is slowly being filtered out in favor of Popular Culture. The old ways and traditions are for the average person just outdated and no longer all that relevant. How has the Folk Culture that remained stayed around? How exactly is it spreading and is it in dangerous of being extinguished? I’m going to take a look specifically at the Amish, how they’ve spread and how they’ve adapted to still living their lifestyle in modern society.

The Amish derive from the Anabaptists of the 16th century. They were basically a religious group that turned away from the catholic teachings in favor of their own practices. This did not go over well with the Catholics who viewed them as heretics. A lot of them died back then in Europe for their beliefs, as most were very non-violent, and they were under religious persecution for quite some time.

This religious persecution was in large part the reason some many Amish left Europe in favor of the United States. The US was seen as a symbol of freedom and a land where they could practice their faith in peace. They came in waves after waves with certain time periods being very stagnant. These periods were the War of 1812 and the American Civil war when immigration became a lot more dangerous. For the most part the Amish constantly flooded out of Europe as fast as they could though. The ones that remained lost their identity due to them being so little in number that their traditions couldn’t really be kept alive. In 1937 the final Amish church merged with another religion and the European Amish were no more.

The Amish spread fast but didn’t go all that far west as evident in the map of their communities above. The answer to the way the Amish have kept their own folk culture alive is rooted in the folk culture itself. It’s very strict and very family and community oriented. They do not concern themselves much with other people outside of their communities. A key point in their culture is to actually separate themselves from other people, from worldly sin. It’s almost as if they’ve locked themselves away in a culture bubble, and because that bubble is so strong due to their values it hasn’t really burst. They don’t really bother anyone else and they’re all so close together and tight knit that for the most part people don’t really have much of a reason to bother them either.

That’s slowly changing though; the Amish are adapting some more modern culture but at the same time still staying true to their roots. For example while they still all reject traditional electricity for power for the most part, some Amish have adapted to using things like solar power. It’s a way of progressing in some form, while still maintaining their folk culture. Tourism has also been a bit of a problem in more modern times. Tourism brings in business and helps their economy, but tourists also bring in more modern culture and breaks down a bit of the bubble the Amish have built around themselves.

In conclusion the Amish spread because they had too, they are not a violent people and they just ran to a place where they could practice in peace. They have remained immune from modern culture because of their values both in terms of religion and their sense of community. I wonder if the bubble they’ve built around themselves will ever burst? I suppose only time will tell.

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Work Cited:
Sources
Exploring Amish Country. “Amish History Is A Story Of Struggle And Faith.” Amish History. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Nov. 2013.
Parrillo, Lia. “The Amish.” Lewis Historical Society. N.p., 9 May 2010. Web. 29 Nov. 2013.

Pictures

http://digitalunion.osu.edu/r2/summer07/eellis/images/indexmap2.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0f/Lancaster_County_Amish_03.jpg

http://abcnews.go.com/images/US/gty_amish_ll_120730_wblog.jpg

Edited by:
Emily Flora, Jessica Silverstri, Jacob Standafer.

The Korean Wave.

Shae Kovalchick

Geo 106

Popular Culture is an interesting topic, just due to how it spreads across the planet. Worldwide appeal is hard to come by, because of the diversity of the world and the people living in it. Despite this, there is some leakage from one country or culture to another and how it goes about going from one place to another is fascinating. I plan on looking at Korea, and how its popular culture has spread across the globe.

   Korean pop culture has become so big and has expanded so quickly there is actually a term for the phenomenon. That term is “Hallyu” or the Korean Wave; it was coined over ten years ago by a Chinese journalist. The way it’s actually spread is by use of media, now in more recent years that media being the internet.

   Everything from Blogs to YouTube have helped the Korean sensation spread. For quite some time the Hallyu was basically just hitting parts of Asia, but in more much more recent years it’s gone global. It’s really just a combination of people enjoying it, and having access to it. Ease of access is extremely important in regards to helping not only Korean but, all pop culture spread from one place to another.

    It also helps that the South Korean government really embraces this movement. They see it as an extremely profitable device, and have put a lot of money into helping it grow and spread. Not only do they see it as profitable, but it’s a good device to use to help combat any Anti-Korean sentiments that people may have. If there culture is more accepted everywhere the bias against them may begin to fade away. The South Koreans also hope that by spreading their culture it might eventually help in reuniting the two Koreas back together.

So in conclusion there are multiple reasons for the Korean culture spreading everywhere. The primary being just due to its overall appeal, and the ease of access people have to it. It’s also very helpful that its government is behind the movement and doing what it can to help its popular culture spread across the globe.

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Work Cited:
Sources:
Farrar, Lara. “‘Korean Wave’ of Pop Culture Sweeps across Asia.” CNN. Cable News Network, 31 Dec. 2010. Web. 22 Nov. 2013.
Anjaiah, Veramalla. “Korean Culture Spreads across Globe.” Home. The Jakarta Post, 18 July 2012. Web. 26 Nov. 2013.

Pictures:

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/94555370/The-Korean-Wave—A-New-Pop-Culture-Phenomenon

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02349/psy_2349018k.jpg

http://images.nationmaster.com/images/motw/middle_east_and_asia/south_korea.jpg

Edited by:
Samuel Oliver
Jacob Standafer
Oren Paisner

The Spread of the English Language.

Shae Kovalchick

Geo 106

Language is something pretty much everyone on the planet is exposed to. How does it really spread around the globe though? Why are some languages a lot more common than others? English for example, how does it spread from the US and UK to other places with such power and force? How did it become such a staple language? I’m going to observe how English has spread in the past and present.

As you can see above, the countries where English is primarily spoken is all across the globe. This isn’t even factoring in places that hold English as a secondary language. The first major way that English made its way around the globe was due to the British. They founded different colonies that spread all over, and when they took over they obviously used their own language. This is the reasoning behind the earliest uses of English in places that aren’t England. This is also why a place in India in which you wouldn’t really associate with English has English as their second most spoken language.

Eventually nobody was settling any new colonies but, use of English still grew. In the First World War English was viewed as a sort of symbol for peace and freedom. The American dream was a very powerful concept, and English was a cog in the American dream machine. Furthermore, in more recent years America has become a global powerhouse of sorts. Not only with regards to the military or from an economic standpoint, but from a media standpoint as well. Everything from popular television, to music, to the internet itself, the English language has a lot of weight behind those things. If the best resources or forms of media are in one language it isn’t a surprise that language would spread elsewhere. There are also many forms or styles of English with many different accents. This helps it be more accessible to everyone. There is even an extremely broad category of English referred to as Globish, which is essentially just International English.

So in conclusion, the power of the countries using English and the symbolism behind it were the key factors in helping it spread. From takeovers centuries ago, to modern music and media today English has, and continues to spread like wildfire. I see no signs of it slowing down or stopping anytime in the future.

 

Figure 1 – Map of countries that speak English as a primary language.

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Work Cited
Pictures:
http://www.audioeditions.com/audio-book-images/l/Globish-690971.jpg
http://top-10-list.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/english-language.png
https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTw8fKwsPANNQVyB4fbx-UX0YjsZpVY3VWH1JYjFBSlVFWMy_QY_g

Sources:
Park, Sohyun. “The Spread of English in the Modern Period.” The Spread of English in the Modern Period. N.p., 20 May 2011. Web. 25 Nov. 2013.

“What Are the Origins of the English Language?” Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 25 Nov. 2013.

Edited by:
Oren Paisner
Ellie Strandquist
Jacob Standafer