Tag Archives: Kyra Binaxas

Network Marketing.

Kyra Binaxas

Human culture has always been distributed across the globe in different ways. A new element of human culture that seems to be having a great impact on human society at a now global scale is network marketing. Network marketing is a fairly new type of industry that has been said to be the business of the twenty-first century.

The concept is that a product gets recognized and sold due to word of mouth from ordinary people in every day life versus utilizing celebrities, adds, and in store sales. By using this method average people are able to create residual income based on how many individuals they recruit to buy, utilize, and promote the product themselves. Many motivational speakers such as Robert Kiyosaki back this industry one hundred percent!

It has, in fact, been proven to create more millionaires than any other industry out there! Different cultures have different perspectives on this concept of network marketing. When promotion for making money in this way is passed on to many of the eastern cultures- people of that area is not as consumed with financial issues as those of the western world. Value to them lies more so in family assets and traditional culture than becoming the next billionaire. As a result this service is not as popular. Also it does take money to start up in this industry so it would not be able to work in the more poverty stricken areas of the world. With any industry great risk is involved, but especially with network marketing because not all companies involved in this industry are ethical. Whatever business people choose to enter I can only hope that they have done their research, know that it is the right choice for them, and always continue to remain passionate!

Works cited

  1. . N.p.. Web. 9 Dec 2013. <http://richdadmanila.com/is-network-marketing-the-business-of-the-future/&gt;.
  2. . N.p.. Web. 9 Dec 2013. <http://mlmattorney.com/blog/2012/06/21/network-marketing-a-growing-industry-hard-facts-and-the-future/&gt;.

Edited by:

Jacob Standafer, Jessica Silvestri, Ellie Strandquist

Kyra Binaxas

            The novel Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup is an excellent rendition of slavery in antebellum society and greatly exemplifies how politics effected views on African Americans, as well as how it dictated their religion and literacy.

This novel tells the story of one free mans true account of his being captured and sold into slavery, subjected to its brutality for over a decade of his life. The propaganda and explanation for holding the slave population captive was directly the result of political influence. It was for the best of the southern economy and was successful in convincing much of the white population that African Americans in fact enjoyed their lifestyle and were unable to comprehend the idea of what it was to be a free man. The religious stories told to the slave population were those of obedience and reform. The way religion was utilized was political itself, although still providing a form of salvation, was not spoken of or taught in much of the same way that it would be exercised it today. The novel not only depicts this usage but also the difference in literacy of that of the free man and the slave. Human beings born into slavery were purposefully not taught to be literate specifically for a political agenda. The difference between communication among those born to slavery and those who were not depicted in the novel is truly great.

Works Cited

  1. Northup, Solomon. Twelve Years A Slave . Dover Ed. Auburn, NY: Dover Publications, 2000. Print.
  2. Rubenstein, James. The Cultural Landscape. 11th ed. Pearson Education, Print.

Edited by:

Jessica Silvestri, Ellie Strandquist, Jacob Standofer

Kyra Binaxas

            Egypt greatly exemplifies a country that bases its political movements around language, ethnicity, and religion. Among many other Middle Eastern countries Egypt is at a crossroads between tying its political policies with strong Islamist values and religion or moving forward to having a more westernized influence, yet still identifying strongly with Arabic culture. Khairat El-Shater’s candidacy for president of Egypt became a conflict that clearly shows this constant battle between religion and ethnicity.

Khairat El-Shater is the chief strategist and financier for an organization called The Muslim Brotherhood. By definition The Muslim Brotherhood is, “ A religious and political group founded on the belief that Islam is not simply a religion, but a way of life. It advocates a move away from secularism, and a return to the rules of the Quran as a basis for healthy families, communities, and states.” (Jones). This organization holds most of the power in Congress and if Shater were to gain presidency it would therefor result in The Muslim Brotherhood obtaining a complete political monopoly over Egyptian politics fixed on the basis of Islamic religion.

Hosni Mubarak- Egypt’s former president- outlawed The Muslim Brotherhood. The majority of the educated youth of Egypt are against holding traditional Islamic values as the basis of their political influence. They fight for a more westernized and liberal society. Although they fight for westernization and democracy they do not want any outside help. They still view non-Arabic people who are trying to speed up the process for westernization as intruders. So they essentially still hold ethnicity to a high degree of importance. Whatever the result may be of Egypt’s political dilemma both hold influence centered around concept that unify how people identify themselves in the Middle East- either religious value or ethnicity and language. Hopefully one day Egypt, along with the rest of the Middle East may become societies of peace, correlating their political movements with that of which are best for all their people.

Works Cited

1) Kirkpatrick, David. “Islamist Group Breaks Pledge to Stay Out of Race in Egypt.” New York Times [New York] 31 03 2012, n. pag. Web. 5 Nov. 2013. <http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/01/world/middleeast/brotherhood-chooses-a-candidate-in-egypt.html&gt;.

2) Kirkpatrick, David. “Keeper of Islamic Flame Rises as Egypt’s New Decisive Voice .” New York Times [New York ] 12 03 2012, n. pag. Web. 5 Nov. 2013. <http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/12/world/middleeast/muslim-brotherhood-leader-rises-as-egypts-decisive-voice.html?_r=0&gt;.

3) Jones, Bryony, dir. What is the Muslim Brotherhood. Writ. Susanna Cullinane. CNN.Com, 2013. Web. 5 Nov 2013. <http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/03/world/africa/egypt-muslim-brotherhood-explainer/&gt;.

Edited By:

Jacob Standofer, Oren Paisner, Jessica Silvestri

Where does my water come from?

Kyra Binaxas

            Water distribution is a clear example of physical environments affecting political processes. The city of Boulder is very fortunate to have the water supply that it does. Based on the bodies of water that it owns, Boulder has made it so that it will have clean drinking water for its residents for decades to come!

The surrounding areas, however, do not seem to be as fortunate. Due to the striking amount of water available to be utilized for drinking this resource has become political. Boulder County rests on a location that makes companies that bottle water view it as having both positive situation and site factors. This makes it liked by companies that hold proximity to markets, along with the fact that tap water is essentially free therefor companies that bottle it and keep it close to their consumers are able to make a huge profit!

The city of Boulder owns the Silver Lake/ Lakewood watershed and the Arapaho Glacier- that is actually more like a permanent snowfield.

Boulder city also has senior water rights on middle boulder creek. Aside from these it also is capable of obtaining some water from the Colorado River after it is pumped through a funnel from Grand County. Boulder receives 40% of its drinking water from Barker reservoir on middle boulder creek, another 40% from the Silver Lake/ Lakewood watershed on North Boulder Creek, and then just 20% from the piece of the Boulder reservoir that is filled by the Colorado River. This puts the city of Boulders residents in a very favorable place when it comes to them having access to drinking water for decades to come. Other towns in Boulder County rely much more heavily on the Colorado River, nor do they have plans to meet water demands in coming decades.

Something for Boulder residents to consider-especially those residents that just reside in Boulder County, not city- is the fact that they live in and area with such a positive situation factor. The Boulder location makes it so that costs of transportation of goods- in this case water- is very minimal. Profits are high and there is plenty of water to go around! At least for now- if residents keep allowing big name companies to deplete their water source than it may not be so plentiful in the future. This positive situation factor allows for a positive site factor as well. Ultimately resulting in companies being capable of having proximity to markets. Meaning they are able to be as close to the consumer as possible without it costing them and money or inconvenience. Typically this results in the inconvenience of the residents whose resource is being depleted being of no concern, nor is it ever dealt with.

Boulder city holds ownership for many plentiful surrounding resources that provide large water supply, and this is not something to be taken fro granted. Hopefully in the decades to come all human beings that reside in Boulder cities surrounding areas as well as in Colorado will realize that their fantastic location is not one that should be taken advantage of by large corporations. Clean drinking water should always be a right and not a privilege. Following is a map of primary water Sources of the Boulder creek watershed. The main sources being numbers: 1- Middle Boulder creek, 2- North Boulder creek, Silver Lake, and finally 6- Main stem.

Works Cited

1) . N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <http://biggreenboulder.com/where-we-get-our-water/&gt;.

2) . N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <http://bcn.boulder.co.us/basin/waterworks/&gt;.

3) . N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <. N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. .>.

Edited by:

Jessica Silvestri, Ellie Strandquist, Jennah Remain

Works Cited

1) . N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <http://biggreenboulder.com/where-we-get-our-water/&gt;.

2) . N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <http://bcn.boulder.co.us/basin/waterworks/&gt;.

3) . N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <. N.p.. Web. 13 Nov 2013. .>.

Edited by:

Jessica Silvestri, Ellie Strandquist, Jennah Reiman